Skip to main content

AFLX Experiment Continues

AFLX Field Layout. Image courtesy of AFL

The AFL will continue its experiment with its radically shortened version of the game, AFLX, in a round-robin tournament at Marvel Stadium on Friday, February 22nd. The competition will climax with a final between the top two teams.

It’s AFL, but not as we know it...

The game format is intended to showcase the fast and furious aspects of Australian football, but played on a rectangular field similar to a soccer or American football field. The playing area is just 110 meters (120 yards) in length. There is a 10-meter "launching zone" in the middle of the ground and a 15-meter "forward zone" at each end of the field. The resemblance to AFL is maintained by using standard AFL goal posts.

Each team has fourteen players with only eight of their players permitted on the field at any one time, while the rest sit on the interchange bench. There are no limits on the number of interchanges or substitutions permitted. The game is played in two ten minute halves with no time on added for delays or stoppages.

Play starts with the umpire throwing the ball up in the center of the ground.

Read more

New Rules For 2019

Several months ago, the AFL announced new rule changes for 2019. Perhaps the most welcome change - for defenders at least - is the elimination of the hands in the back rule. No longer will a free kick be awarded to a player who simply places his hands on the back of his opponent. A push will still be penalized.

After a point is scored, players will now be allowed to run through the goal square and take off without having to kick the ball to themselves. They will also be allowed to handball the ball out from a behind instead of being restricted to just kicking it to themselves in the goal square or to a teammate. The opposition player standing at "the mark" in front of the goal square will be positioned 10 meters (11 yards) from the edge of the square rather than the previous five meters.

Read more

Second Chance For Overlooked Players

Mason Cox tackles Zac Clarke

The AFL has introduced a new signing period for players overlooked in the draft and rookie draft. One is the supplemental selection period (SSP) between December 1 and March 15, after all the drafts are over. The SSP is for state league players who miss out on the draft as well as players recently delisted by their clubs. To be eligible, players must have previously nominated for the national draft or previously been on an AFL club list.  

Read more

No More Grand Final Replays

by Lisa Albergo reporting for AFANA from Chicago

In the 120 years of Australian Rules Football, there have been only three tied Grand Finals and five tied Finals matches. In most cases, there was always a replay. Up until the introduction of interstate teams, a replay the following week was not an issue with all the teams based in the state of Victoria, Geelong is about a one hour drive to and from Melbourne. However, in 1990 when a Qualifying Final between Collingwood and West Coast ended with scores level, it meant the Eagles would have to return to Perth after the game and then travel back Melbourne the following week for the replay. Needless to say, Collingwood won the replay.

Read more

Footy World Divided On Replacement Players

 by Lisa Albergo reporting for AFANA from Chicago

Here are reactions from around the footy world to the replacement players allowed for Essendon, but not for other affected clubs:

Journalist Martin Blake, who has a weekly spot on Kevin Bartlett's show Hungry For Sport, said that since the players had been convicted, there should be no compensation. He accused the AFL of compromising, saying the league didn't want a powerhouse club like Essendon to not be able to field a team. He said the club should just have elevated the rookies.

Former Bulldog and Tiger coach Terry Wallace queried why Port Adelaide weren’t allowed to replace Angus Monfries,

Read more

Common Questions and Answers about Aussie Rules

Questions and Answers about Australian football or “Aussie rules football”

This is a basic introduction to the sport. You will find answers to some common questions. This won’t make you an expert but it should get you started.

If you don't find the answer here, we have some additional resources:

Links to individual questions:

AFL Reviews Drug Code

by Lisa Albergo reporting for AFANA from Chicago

After the Essendon supplements saga broke at the start of the 2013 season, the AFL announced they would review and revamp some of the rules governing supplement use. This has now been done with the League contacting the 18 clubs outlining the requirements. These requirements, approved by ASADA, also cover guidelines for professionals employed by clubs.

Read more

What Is Australian Football? Video Explanations

What is Australian Football?

Would you like to learn more about Aussie rules? Learn about the rules, key features of the game, and it's history? Below are some videos that might help. Be sure to check our other resources, at the following links:

Coaches Unhappy With New Technologies

 by Lisa Albergo reporting for AFANA from Chicago

The AFL used Round 15 to test a new goal review system imported from England. The blockbuster between Carlton and Collingwood was one of three games in which the Hawk-Eye technology was tried. The new system, however, was only being tried and not actually used to adjudicate any scores. Unlike the current system, which uses available replay footage, the new technology allows reviewers to see the scoring shot from a variety of angles as well as manipulating the vision themselves and even excluding angles to focus on just one or two to assist in determining the score. The multiple-angle technology allows comparative views to determine if the ball has been touched before passing the goal line, or whether it hit the goal post.

Read more

Concern After Malthouse and Bartlett Meet

by Lisa Albergo reporting for AFANA from Chicago

Shortly after Mick Malthouse made his comments regarding the NAB Cup interchange limits, Laws Committee chairman Kevin Bartlett blasted Mick and the criticisms on his SEN radio program. He called the coaches selfish, saying their only interest was to win games and they did not have the wider interest of the game at heart. He accused them of "running roughshod" over the rules committee.

Read more

Recent content

Partners

Worldfootynews.com
Official Statistics Partner of AFANA